Welcome to Jingle Poetry!

Friday, September 12, 2014

Poetry As Forms of Blind Dating: Happy 4th Birthday to Jingle Poetry at Washington State




Specific poetic forms have been developed by many cultures. In more developed, closed or "received" poetic forms, the rhyming scheme, meter and other elements of a poem are based on sets of rules, ranging from the relatively loose rules that govern the construction of an elegy to the highly formalized structure of the ghazal or villanelle.[95] Described below are some common forms of poetry widely used across a number of languages. Additional forms of poetry may be found in the discussions of poetry of particular cultures or periods and in the glossary.

Sonnet

Main article: Sonnet
Among the most common forms of poetry through the ages is the sonnet, which by the 13th century was a poem of fourteen lines following a set rhyme scheme and logical structure. By the 14th century, the form further crystallized under the pen of Petrarch, whose sonnets were later translated in the 16th century by Sir Thomas Wyatt, who is credited with introducing the sonnet form into English literature.[96] A sonnet's first four lines typically introduce the topic, the second elaborates and the third posits a problem - the couplet usually, but not always, includes a twist, or an afterthought. A sonnet usually follows an a-b-a-b-c-d-c-d-e-f-e-f-gg rhyme pattern. The sonnet's conventions have changed over its history, and so there are several different sonnet forms. Traditionally, in sonnets English poets use iambic pentameter, the Spenserian and Shakespearean sonnets being especially notable.[97] In the Romance languages, the hendecasyllable and Alexandrine are the most widely used meters, though the Petrarchan sonnet has been used in Italy since the 14th century.[98]
Sonnets are particularly associated with love poetry, and often use a poetic diction heavily based on vivid imagery, but the twists and turns associated with the move from octave to sestet and to final couplet make them a useful and dynamic form for many subjects.[99] Shakespeare's sonnets are among the most famous in English poetry, with 20 being included in the Oxford Book of English Verse.[100]

Shi

Main article: Shi (poetry)
Shi (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: shī; Wade–Giles: shih) Is the main type of Classical Chinese poetry.[101] Within this form of poetry the most important variations are "folk song" styled verse (yuefu), "old style" verse (gushi), "modern style" verse (jintishi). In all cases, rhyming is obligatory. The Yuefu is a folk ballad or a poem written in the folk ballad style, and the number of lines and the length of the lines could be irregular. For the other variations of shi poetry, generally either a four line (quatrain, or jueju) or else an eight line poem is normal; either way with the even numbered lines rhyming. The line length is scanned by according number of characters (according to the convention that one character equals one syllable), and are predominantly either five or seven characters long, with a caesura before the final three syllables. The lines are generally end-stopped, considered as a series of couplets, and exhibit verbal parallelism as a key poetic device.[102] The "old style" verse (gushi) is less formally strict than the jintishi, or regulated verse, which, despite the name "new style" verse actually had its theoretical basis laid as far back to Shen Yue, in the 5th or 6th century, although not considered to have reached its full development until the time of Chen Zi'ang (661-702)[103] A good example of a poet known for his gushi poems is Li Bai. Among its other rules, the jintishi rules regulate the tonal variations within a poem, including the use of set patterns of the four tones of Middle Chinese The basic form of jintishi (lushi) has eight lines in four couplets, with parallelism between the lines in the second and third couplets. The couplets with parallel lines contain contrasting content but an identical grammatical relationship between words. Jintishi often have a rich poetic diction, full of allusion, and can have a wide range of subject, including history and politics.[104][105] One of the masters of the form was Du Fu, who wrote during the Tang Dynasty (8th century).[106]





Villanelle

Main article: Villanelle
The villanelle is a nineteen-line poem made up of five triplets with a closing quatrain; the poem is characterized by having two refrains, initially used in the first and third lines of the first stanza, and then alternately used at the close of each subsequent stanza until the final quatrain, which is concluded by the two refrains. The remaining lines of the poem have an a-b alternating rhyme.[107] The villanelle has been used regularly in the English language since the late 19th century by such poets as Dylan Thomas,[108] W. H. Auden,[109] and Elizabeth Bishop.[110]

Tanka

Main article: Tanka
Tanka is a form of unrhymed Japanese poetry, with five sections totalling 31 onji (phonological units identical to morae), structured in a 5-7-5-7-7 pattern.[111] There is generally a shift in tone and subject matter between the upper 5-7-5 phrase and the lower 7-7 phrase. Tanka were written as early as the Asuka period by such poets as Kakinomoto no Hitomaro, at a time when Japan was emerging from a period where much of its poetry followed Chinese form.[112] Tanka was originally the shorter form of Japanese formal poetry (which was generally referred to as "waka"), and was used more heavily to explore personal rather than public themes. By the tenth century, tanka had become the dominant form of Japanese poetry, to the point where the originally general term waka ("Japanese poetry") came to be used exclusively for tanka. Tanka are still widely written today.[113]

Haiku

Main article: Haiku
Haiku is a popular form of unrhymed Japanese poetry, which evolved in the 17th century from the hokku, or opening verse of a renku.[114] Generally written in a single vertical line, the haiku contains three sections totalling 17 onji, structured in a 5-7-5 pattern. Traditionally, haiku contain a kireji, or cutting word, usually placed at the end of one of the poem's three sections, and a kigo, or season-word.[115] The most famous exponent of the haiku was Matsuo Bashō (1644–1694). An example of his writing:[116]
富士の風や扇にのせて江戸土産
fuji no kaze ya oogi ni nosete Edo miyage
the wind of Mt. Fuji
I've brought on my fan!
a gift from Edo
 
 
 
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Thursday, July 3, 2014

Fourth of July quotes and poems: Stay Joyful, Enjoy 2014 Fireworks! (By sheknows.com)

 


Celebrating Independence Day

Fourth of July isn't all about barbecues and fireworks. It's also about freedom, liberty and the birthday of our country. Teach your kids about the history of Independence Day by reading books, quotes, poems and other anecdotes.
Family with American flag

Fourth of July quotes

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.
~ The Declaration of Independence July 4, 1776
I am apt to believe that it will be celebrated by succeeding generations as the great anniversary festival. It ought to be commemorated as the day of deliverance, by solemn acts of devotion to God Almighty. It ought to be solemnized with pomp and parade, with shows, games, sports, guns, bells, bonfires, and illuminations, from one end of this continent to the other, from this time forward for evermore.
~ John Adams
You have to love a nation that celebrates its independence every July 4, not with a parade of guns, tanks, and soldiers who file by the White House in a show of strength and muscle, but with family picnics where kids throw Frisbees, the potato salad gets iffy, and the flies die from happiness. You may think you have overeaten, but it is patriotism.
~ Erma Bombeck

Freedom quotes

One flag, one land, one heart, one hand, One Nation evermore!
~ Oliver Wendell Holmes
America is much more than a geographical fact. It is a political and moral fact — the first community in which men set out in principle to institutionalize freedom, responsible government, and human equality.
~ Adlai Stevenson
In the truest sense, freedom cannot be bestowed; it must be achieved.
~ Franklin D. Roosevelt
Those who expect to reap the blessings of freedom, must, like men, undergo the fatigue of supporting it.
~ Thomas Paine

Fourth of July poems

I Hear America Singing

By Walt Whitman
I hear America singing, the varied carols I hear,
Those of mechanics, each one singing his as it should be blithe and strong,
The carpenter singing his as he measures his plank or beam,
The mason singing his as he makes ready for work, or leaves off work,
The boatman singing what belongs to him in his boat, the deckhand singing on the steamboat deck,
The shoemaker singing as he sits on his bench, the hatter singing as he stands,
The wood-cutter’s song, the ploughboy’s on his way in the morning, or at noon intermission or at sundown,
The delicious singing of the mother, or of the young wife at work, or of the girl sewing or washing,
Each singing what belongs to him or her and to none else,
The day what belongs to the day — at night the party of young fellows, robust, friendly,
Singing with open mouths their strong melodious songs.

The Landlord's Tale. Paul Revere's Ride
By Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Listen, my children, and you shall hear
Of the midnight ride of Paul Revere,
On the eighteenth of April, in Seventy-five;
Hardly a man is now alive
Who remembers that famous day and year.



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Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Schemes: Call For World Peace Business Act No. 3, May 1 to May 31, 2014!

 

Schemes are sugar-coated pills,
They look young and yummy,
They dress up as baits
on a fishing pole,
Those who are caught
are unfortunate,
Decent fish swim in deep waters,
They are not easily fooled
by freely offered artificial treats.



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Friday, December 20, 2013

Merry Christmas Mom © Mary Butto

 
For all of the presents
You put under the tree,
For all of the times
You picked up after me...

For all of the times
That you tucked me in tight
And we stayed up to talk
Long into the night

For all of the days
I was feeling so down
And the times that you turned
To a smile my frown

For the cookies you baked
And the stockings you stuffed,
For the cuts that you healed
And the pillows you fluffed...

For the time that you took
Off the training wheels
For the nights that you made me
My favorite meals

For the years throughout
Elementary school
For knowing the right thing
Isn’t always what’s cool

For putting up with
Those preteen years
For making it through
All the laughs and the tears

For all of the days
That you loved me so much
Even during the times
That I made it so tough…

For all of the memories
We have already shared
For the future for which
We cannot be prepared

For being there for that one-year-old boy
Who sat in the house and sucked on his thumb
For working so hard at being his mom
And making that boy into the man I’ve become
Look back on all that we have been through
And look at me now mom, how far I have come

For all of the times I’ll never forget
Merry Christmas to you Mom
Here’s to the memories
We haven’t had yet

Merry Christmas…Love, Nick
 
 

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Thursday, September 12, 2013

Happy 3 Year Birthday to JP Blog Here, and Keep In Mind of Our 12 Years of Pain and Loss Due to 9/11/2001 Event.


image credit: google.com
today is only one day apart  September eleventh, 2013, about 12 years from 9/11 in 2001, when terrorists attacked New York City Twin Towers and killed thousands of innocent people, today, we recall our past and mourn those who died due to the rise of evil power and the persistence of American patriotism and freedom, let's not forget this important event, pray to those who suffered and those family members or relatives who survived but felt the pain of loss...we shall cherish more about the peace, love, and daily comfort we have today, Thanks to former president George Walker Bush and his efforts, thanks to our military soldiers who fight and continue to battle for our beloved country, God bless America! 
The poem below has nothing to do with 9/11, but is is a sad reality check to highlight even today, hunger, natural disasters, and ignorance, they still post as threats to our everyday living and faith, we must act by being a good citizens first, encourage our friends, people we know to love peace, and stop violence and indifference to children and to  those who are needy...Thanks for reading...Bless You All! 

it's hard to describe how I feel right now
I want to explain it but I don't know how
I cannot believe it comes to this
it's our world, not just his
#
no matter how hard we try
the man can never hear us cry
we could scream and yell
but he is in his heaven while we're in our hell
#
The little boy wants his acceptance
but the man keeps his distance
the little boy has so many "whys?"
but the man won't open his eyes
#
The little girl just wants her dad
but the man doesn't understand
the little girl just wants to be kissed and hugged
but all the man does is shrug
#
The woman just wants him
But the light is getting dim
She loves him with all her heart
But the man keeps tearing it apart
#
no matter how hard we try
he can never hear us cry
we could scream and yell
but he is in his heaven while we're in our hell
#
I want to know one more thing
with my last bit of strength
is this it? is this the end?


Quoted post from Timonthy Jacobshen Wood, Thanks for reading...